Leave me a note, and I will get back to you. 


Ottawa, ON
Canada

613 868 3950

The Canadian Financial Advisor

How the investment industry sees advice

Benjamin Felix

A few weeks ago I had the opportunity to speak with John Wilson, CEO of Sprott asset management. We were both attending an alumni dinner, I was there as an alum and he was there as the headline speaker. We bumped into each other during the pre-dinner mingle and took immediate mutual interest due to each other’s name tags. I would have never guessed who he was, so his title of “CEO Sprott Asset management” piqued my interest; John noticed my title of “Investment Advisor” and enthusiastically asked if my firm uses Sprott funds. I almost felt bad telling him that we would never consider using Sprott funds. I explained the idea of a market based investment philosophy and mentioned Dimensional funds and he proceeded to laugh that I had drank the kool-aid. He asked me why I would would want to buy index funds when there are managers that outperform the market? I rebutted that it is next to impossible to consistently determine which fund manager is going to outperform. The conversation went on and finished with John’s final point that it is the job of the investment advisor to find the fund managers that are going to outperform the market. If a client is with a good investment advisor, they will consistently be in the funds that perform well. If their advisor doesn’t pick winning funds, they are not good advisors.

It is not uncommon for advisors to pitch their value as their ability to pick the winning manager ahead of time. Is that investment advice? As a client, do you want the person that you are paying to manage your money to spend their time picking which mutual fund manager is going to be able to beat the market in the future? In reality, investment advice is not about picking the next hot stock or the winning fund manager. Investment advice is about applying an evidence based approach to markets to help people achieve their financial goals while managing their concerns. An advisor that is focused on researching fund managers or picking stocks is only fuelling the emotions that lead to poor investment decisions.